Oedipus Rex: Metaphor of Sight and Insight

Oedipus Rex is a sad tragedy in which Sophocles clearly demonstrates the metaphor of sight and insight, which shows that for one to see the truth and/or reality, one does not need physical sight. Oedipus was ignorant of his reality regardless of his vision. Teiresias, then again, could simply see the truth. Oedipus’s mental blindness left him beaten and obliterated by destiny. By this mean, mental blindness could be more regrettable than physically blindness, as one who cannot use their eyes are aware of their situation, whereas those individuals who are mentally blind may not realize that they are going the wrong way until it is too late to return.

In spite of Teiresias’ words, Oedipus proceeds to blindly seek after his quest. With his conversation with Teiresias, Oedipus is given the solution to his inquiries. He was searching for the killer of king Laios, to which the blind soothsayer replied, “”You (Oedipus) are the murderer whom you seek (20).”” Oedipus reacts to this with outrage, and simply after his conversation with the messenger and the shepherd, does Oedipus understand the terrible truth. However, he finds the truth past the point of no return. He is distressed to the point that he utilizes pins from his mom’s garments to dazzle himself. This was where Oedipus at long last acknowledged reality, saying, “”After exposing the rankness of my own guilt, how could I look men frankly in the eyes? (74). Oedipus is loaded with anguish and blame, knowing the disgrace he has conveyed to his family and exiles himself. In fact, he is ready to think back and perceive the results of his hubris. Oedipus blinding himself symbolizes his newly discovered learning and his capacity to at last see.

Despite the fact that Oedipus couldn’t see the occasions ahead, Teiresias, the visually impaired oracle can see and acknowledge reality, the real truth. Oedipus approaches him for help in finding the killer of Laios. The seer is respected by others and is presented as “”the holy prophet in whom, alone of all men, the truth was born (16).”” Despite being physically blind, it is obvious that Teiresias knows about who murdered King Laios. Notwithstanding, he is unwilling to speak up knowing the reaction he would get from Oedipus. However, after much pushing, Teiresias sincerely uncovers what he knows; Oedipus is the murderer. Oedipus is maddened by reality and he persuades Teiresias’ thought processes, blaming him for plotting with Creon to take the royal position. Reacting to Oedipus’ persuasions, Teiresias answers, “”I say that you, with both your eyes, are blind: You cannot see the wretchedness of your life, nor in whose house you live, no, nor with whom. Who are your father and mother? Can you tell me? You do not even know the blind wrongs that you have done them, on earth and in the world below (22).”” His words are bright, demonstrating that despite the fact that Teiresias is physically blind he can see more adequately than Oedipus who has excellent vision, yet can’t see reality, However, it is advised straightforwardly to him. Teiresias foretells, “”the double lash of your parents’ curse will whip you out of this land someday, with only night upon your precious eyes (23).”” As expected, Teiresias has a sense of insight in which he can see mentally and doesn’t fear reality.

Oedipus is exceptionally arrogant and allows his feelings to blind him and keep himself from settling on cool-headed choices. At the start of the play, Oedipus is adored by his people. They venerate him for saving them from the riddle of the Sphinx, and consider him to be the “”wisest in the ways of God (5).”” Accordingly, Oedipus takes in all the acclaim, getting to be prideful and trusts himself to be powerful. After hearing that the plague was caused by the murder of King Laios, Oedipus offers himself to discover the killer, saying, “” Then once more I must bring what is dark to light (9).”” His faith in himself induces Oedipus to announce to his people that he will discover the killer and save Thebes. He doesn’t state that he will attempt or that he will put a valiant effort, however that he will without a doubt solve the case. Oedipus sets his circumstance up for failure. Therefore, on the off chance that he doesn’t succeed, the general population of Thebes will lose confidence in him and consider him inept. Along these lines, Oedipus is adamant to seek after any important lengths to discover Laios’ killer, regardless of the impact it has on his life. Blinded by his own pride, Oedipus makes a promise to his people, subsequently making ready to prompt his own destruction.

The metaphor sight and insight is a critical sense of an individual. It is something by and large misjudged, yet without it, numerous individuals would get themselves defenseless and lost. Sight is also utilized to explore, to associate, and to learn. Nonetheless, individuals with sight can go off to some faraway place and end up unaware of the most evident realities. This psychological visual impairment can be more inconvenient to one’s life than physical visual deficiency. In the play Oedipus Rex, Oedipus experiences this sort of visual deficiency. He has blinded from reality his entire life, subsequently prompting his shocking destiny. As of Oedipus and Teiresias characters, Sophocles utilizes sight and insight to viably demonstrate how one’s uncontrolled feelings are blinding, and why physical sight isn’t required for one to see reality.

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